Home » Latin Writers Known Only From Secondary Sources: Granius Flaccus, Appius Claudius Caecus, Sabinus, Cornificia, Sempronius Asellio by Books LLC
Latin Writers Known Only From Secondary Sources: Granius Flaccus, Appius Claudius Caecus, Sabinus, Cornificia, Sempronius Asellio Books LLC

Latin Writers Known Only From Secondary Sources: Granius Flaccus, Appius Claudius Caecus, Sabinus, Cornificia, Sempronius Asellio

Books LLC

Published May 26th 2010
ISBN : 9781156966921
Paperback
50 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Granius Flaccus, Appius Claudius Caecus, Sabinus, Cornificia, Sempronius Asellio, Alphius Avitus, Albinovanus Pedo, Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus Gaetulicus, Lucius Varius Rufus, Marcus Actorius Naso, Aulus Caecina Severus, Licinius Macer,MoreChapters: Granius Flaccus, Appius Claudius Caecus, Sabinus, Cornificia, Sempronius Asellio, Alphius Avitus, Albinovanus Pedo, Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus Gaetulicus, Lucius Varius Rufus, Marcus Actorius Naso, Aulus Caecina Severus, Licinius Macer, Cornelius Severus, Gaius Maecenas Melissus, Abronius Silo, Valerius Aedituus, Lucius Orbilius Pupillus. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 49. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Granius Flaccus (1st century BC) was an antiquarian and scholar of Roman law and religion, probably in the time of Julius Caesar and Augustus. Granius wrote a book De indigitamentis (On Forms of Address), on the indigitamenta, that is, those pontifical books that contained prayer formularies or lists of deity names as a reference for accurate invocations. Granius dedicated this work to Caesar, as his contemporary Varro did his Antiquitates Divinae. The title of the book is taken from a citation in the 3rd-century grammarian Censorinus. Macrobius cites him jointly with Varro as an authority on a religious point. Granius was used as a source on ancient Roman religion by the Church Fathers- Arnobius, for instance, refers to him as many as five times in his books Contra Paganos, second in number only to Varro, equal to the famed Pythagorean scholar Nigidius Figulus, and more often than Cicero. Arnobius implies that he knows the works of Aristotle only indirectly, and cites Granius as his intermediary source at least once. Granius, he says, demonstrates that Minerva is Luna, and also identified the Novensiles with the Muses. Granius maintained that the Genius and the Lar were one and the same. He shared the view of Varro that the res divinae for both Apollo and Father Liber were celebrated on Mount Parnassus. It is sometimes unclear whether references to Flaccus refer ...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=2622511