Home » Massacri e cultura. Le battaglie che hanno portato la civiltà occidentale a dominare il mondo by Victor Davis Hanson
Massacri e cultura. Le battaglie che hanno portato la civiltà occidentale a dominare il mondo Victor Davis Hanson

Massacri e cultura. Le battaglie che hanno portato la civiltà occidentale a dominare il mondo

Victor Davis Hanson

Published
ISBN : 9788811692881
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 About the Book 

Many theories have been offered regarding why Western culture has spread so successfully across the world, with arguments ranging from genetics to superior technology to the creation of enlightened economic, moral & political systems. In CarnageMoreMany theories have been offered regarding why Western culture has spread so successfully across the world, with arguments ranging from genetics to superior technology to the creation of enlightened economic, moral & political systems. In Carnage & Culture, military historian Hanson takes all of these factors into account in making a bold, controversial argument: Westerners are more effective killers. Focusing specifically on military power rather than the nature of Western civilization in general, he views war as the ultimate reflection of a societys character: There is a cultural crystallization in battle, in which the insidious & more subtle institutions that heretofore are murky & undefined became stark & unforgiving in the finality of organized killing. Tho technological advances & superior weapons have certainly played a role in Western military dominance, he posits that cultural distinctions are the most significant factors. By bringing personal freedom, discipline & organization to the battlefield, powerful marching democracies were more apt to defeat non-Western nations hampered by unstable governments, limited funding & intolerance of open discussion. These crucial differences often ensured victory even against long odds. Greek armies who elected their own generals & freely debated strategy were able to win wars even when outnumbered & deep within enemy territory. He further argues that granting warriors control of their own destinies results in the kind of glorification of horrific hand-to-hand combat necessary for true domination. The nine battles he examines include the Greek naval victory against the Persians at Salamis in 480 BC, Cortes march on Mexico City in 1521, the battle of Midway in 1942 & the 1968 Tet Offensive in Vietnam. In the final chapter, he then looks forward & ponders the consequences of a complete cultural victory, challenging the widespread belief that democratic nations dont wage war against one another: We may well be all Westerners in the millennium to come, & that could be a very dangerous thing indeed. It seems the West will always seek an enemy, even if it must come from within.--Shawn Carkonen (edited)